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Homily

Homily :: September 17, 2017

09/17/17: Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      09/17/17: Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(5:53, 5.39 MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      09/17/17: Twenty-Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(7:39, 7.01 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The Scriptures for this Sunday revolve around the concepts of forgiveness, God’s great mercy and the criteria for us to receive forgiveness and reconciliation.

The Book of Sirach dates from the second century before Christ. The book was not accepted into the Hebrew Bible and as a result, the original Hebrew text was not preserved in the Jewish canon. It is a collection of ethical teachings. In the reading from Sirach, the listener is challenged to forgive the injustice meted out by a neighbor, so that when he/she prays, one’s own sin will be forgiven. Wrath and anger will keep a sinner bound in negativity. Forgiveness will allow the person to be free and open not only to God’s mercy and forgiveness, but also be a better member of society. Sirach points out that revenge is never the path for the righteous, rather forgiveness.

Paul’s letter to the Romans, written in the 50’s is a “developed theology of the gospel of justification and salvation of Jew and Greek alike by the grace of God through faith in Jesus Christ, revealing uprightness and love of God the Father.” (J. Fitzmyer) In the short passage today, Paul reminds us that we live totally “for the Lord.” Christ came, to be both the Lord of the dead and the living. This is part of a larger segment of the epistle in which Paul outlines how we are all called and challenged to live under the grace of God, come to us in Jesus Christ.

Matthew’s Gospel presents one of the more challenging calls to forgiveness in the New Testament. This is immediately preceded by the case of how to treat an unrepentant church member. The call to forgive seventy times seven times, emphasizes the point that Christians have no right to place any limit on forgiveness. Forgive as often as it is necessary. The parable of the unjust steward reinforces the message. The actions of the king in the parable liken him to the action of God. The king demands a reckoning and shows great mercy in writing off the debt. This same servant, when confronting a fellow debtor, showed no such mercy and thus was subject to a harsh judgment. The story warns us that the forgiveness granted by God will be revoked unless we are willing to forgive others. The unforgiving person is excluded from God’s mercy. Those who wish to receive God’s mercy must show mercy toward others.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2011, OCP. All rights reserved.


State of the Parish :: September 10, 2017

09/10/17: Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      09/10/17: Twenty-Third Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(11:03, 10.1 MB)
State of the Parish


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The prophet Ezekiel is charged to make the nation aware of their shortcomings, lest they die. The prophet is warned that should he not make known Israel’s sins to the people, they will die, but his life will likewise be required of him. If the “wicked” are warned and do not repent, they will perish, however, the prophet will live.

The selection from Paul’s Letter to the Romans lists a number of the commandments from the Decalogue, yet sums them up with one of the “greatest” commandments, to love your neighbor as you love yourself. In the epistle, Paul is reflecting on the place of the law in the Christian life. Jesus is the fulfillment of the law, and Christians are charged to “love” as this is the epitome of living a life of faithfulness.

Matthew’s Gospel provides a periscope on church discipline. If a member of the body needs correction, first you can approach him privately, if this does not work, then you are charged to bring witnesses. If the person in the wrong, does not listen, then the entire Church is to be involved in trying to set the “brother” who sinned on the right path. If all else fails, the person is to be treated as an outsider and basically excommunicated from the church. Apologetics will use the conclusion of today’s Gospel to provide a foundation for the sacrament of confession. The Church is granted the power and charge of reconciliation. In conclusion, the promise is given that where “two or three are gathered in my name”, I will be present in their midst. This is a testament to the proximate presence of Christ that the early community experienced when gathered in prayer.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved


Homily :: September 3, 2017

09/03/17: Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson Fr. Dave Reeson

      09/03/17: Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(4:46, 4.37 MB)


Fr Pat Nields Fr Pat Nields

      09/03/17: Twenty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(7:33, 6.91 MB)


Daily Readings
Today’s Reading

If, in a dream, we were to find a magical lamp, and be given any number of wishes, the odds seem good that we would likely ask our genie for long life, wealth, and, perhaps, some come-uppance over our enemies. In today’s first reading, Solomon is asked such a question by God. Instead, Solomon asks for wisdom, so that he may govern the people well and help them honor the covenant they had made with God. In effect, Solomon forgoes earthly success for spiritual gain. Solomon’s wish is paralleled in the first two parables in today’s Gospel reading. Here we are instructed that, having found the kingdom of God, our proper response should be to pursue the kingdom of God relentlessly – selling all that we have. In all of these three episodes, God is readily available (God comes to Solomon, and the treasures have been found) and the individual proper response is to embrace God’s presence.

How, then, can we come to recognize the kingdom, in order that we might seek it? Today’s responsorial psalm provides the key to unlocking this challenge: “Lord, I love your commands.” It is God’s law, made known in the scriptures, and in the liturgy, that we find what is “more precious than thousands of gold and silver pieces.” “In the earthly liturgy we take part in a foretaste of that heavenly liturgy celebrated in the holy city of Jerusalem toward which we journey as pilgrims… We eagerly await the Savior, our Lord Jesus Christ, until he, our life, shall appear and we too will appear with him in glory” (Sacrosanctum Concilium, 8).

By Dave Pitt © 2003, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: August 27, 2017

08/27/17: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      08/27/17: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(5:07, 4.68 MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      08/27/17: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(6:20, 5:80 MB)


Fr Dennis Hannamen
Fr Dennis Hannamen

      08/27/17: Twenty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dennis Hanneman

(9:14, 8:46 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

In today’s first reading we hear of the imminent dismissal of Shebna, master of the palace, or chief steward of the royal household. He would have had the great responsibility of both entrance and exit from Jerusalem. Shebna was removed from his position because he abused his authority. The subsequent installation of Eliakim provides clear context for today’s Gospel reading.

In Isaiah God appoints Eliakim. In Matthew God, in the person of Jesus, appoints Peter. Both are given the same responsibilities, Eliakim to the House of David, Peter to the House of the Son of David. Peter is, thus, made the chief steward of the Church, a role that is continued by the Pope and our Bishops. We too share in this ministry to the degree that we are leaders of our communities.

The second reading crucially illustrates the connection between today’s readings from Isaiah and Matthew: “Who has known the mind of the Lord or who has been His counselor? Or who has given the Lord anything that he may be repaid?” These two rhetorical questions clarify that God does not need His stewards to substitute their wisdom or will for His. Church leaders of all degrees of authority, ourselves included, must be vigilant against abusing their authority, lest the fate of Shebna be ours also.

By Dave Pitt © 2003, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: August 20, 2017

08/20/17: Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      08/20/17: Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(4:01, 3.67 MB MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      08/20/17: Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(8:42, 7.97 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Today’s Gospel presents us with a harsh image of Jesus, who calls the woman, begging on behalf of her daughter, a dog. The key to understanding the nature of Jesus’ reaction deals fundamentally with the status of Israel as the chosen people of God.

The Old Testament describes in detail the relationship between God and Israel. At God’s initiative, they are in covenant with each other forever: God is Israel’s God; and Israel is God’s people. Notice the absence of reference to Gentiles in this framework!

Isaiah, however, proclaims a message of hope that non-Jews might also be saved. This is especially good news for us. Isaiah indicates that “foreigners who join themselves to the Lord… and hold to [his] covenant” are acceptable before God. In this way Gentiles enter into the covenant.

Our model par excellence in this endeavor is the Canaanite woman of today’s Gospel reading. As a non-Jew, she is, decidedly, outside of the fold (as Jesus’ comments indicate). Nonetheless, she comes, as a Gentile on Jewish soil, to the God of Israel in the person of Jesus, the Jew. She addresses him as “Lord,” and prays to him using the language of the Jewish prayer book, the psalms.

Because of her persistent prayer, and her faith in Jesus to answer these prayers, her requests are heard. By placing ourselves at the mercy of God in Christ, we hope that we might participate in the covenant. This is the reason by which we hope, in the words of the psalmist, that God might “have pity on us and bless us [and] let his face shine upon us.”

By Dave Pitt © 2003, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: August 13, 2017

08/13/17: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Deacon David Krueger
Deacon David Krueger
      08/13/17: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn David Kreuger

(6:02, 5.52 MB)


Dcn Bill Hill
Dcn Bill Hill
      08/13/17: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Bill Hill

(6:27,  5.90 MB)


Dcn Russ Perry
Dcn Russ Perry
      08/13/17: Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Russ Perry

(5:54, 5.41 MB)



Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Matthew describes the miracle of Jesus calming the storm in today’s Gospel, along with the miracle of Jesus and Peter walking on the water. This passage is often read in a rational, scientific, light: Jesus merely appeared to be walking on the water, but was actually walking where the water wasn’t deep. To paraphrase Scripture scholar Raymond Brown, it is this type of explanation that is shallow, not the water on which Jesus walked. To focus on the possibility of these miracles is to miss their importance. Similarly, however, to treat these miracles simply as demonstrations of Jesus’ power is to minimize their significance. Instead, we need to look to their importance to the Gospel narrative.

In the first place, within the context of the first reading, we can see how Jesus is revealed as God. In 1 Kings, God is shown as a whispering sound amidst the power of nature. In today’s Gospel Jesus uses classic Old Testament language (“It is I”) to make himself known in the midst of a storm. Thus, we know God in the person of Christ. Second, Matthew uses this event to indicate the role of faith. Peter shares in the power of Christ as long as his faith remains strong. When, however, the “littleness” becomes apparent, Peter begins to drown. Peter is a consolation to us, for our own faith is often small like his. And yet, we find hope in knowing that Christ will save us when we call out despite the size of our faith, saving us just as he saved Peter.

By Dave Pitt © 2003, OCP. All rights reserved.


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