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Homily

Homily :: July 9, 2017

07/09/17: Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Dcn Bob Stier
Dcn Bob Stier
      07/09/17: Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Bob Stier

(6:17, 5.76 MB)


Dcn Dave Graef
Dcn Dave Graef
      07/09/17: Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Dave Graef

(4:22, 4.00 MB)


Dcn Duane Thome
Dcn Duane Thome
      07/09/17: Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Duane Thome

(7:05, 6.49 MB)


Dcn Eric Vande Berg
Dcn Eric Vande Berg
      07/09/17: Fourteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Dcn Eric Vande Berg

(8:34, 7.84 MB)



Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Humble, servant leadership is the overall theme present in both the first reading and the Gospel.

In the selection from Zechariah, which scholars date as composed after the Babylonian exile, the prophet speaks of a “messianic” king who will come as a servant ruler. Weapons of war will be banished in lieu of a universal reign of peace. To the shattered community returning to Jerusalem following the exile, his words may have been a sharp contrast to the kind of “messiah” the people expected who would establish a new kingdom with sword and violence.

It is obvious that Matthew, the evangelist, knew of this prophetic writing in his depiction of Jesus, who comes “meek and humble of heart.” “Meek and humble of heart,” Jesus is presented by the evangelist as a servant leader who helps his followers to carry the burdens of discipleship. Jesus is presented not as dispensing with the law and the prophets but as the fulfillment of the law and the prophets. The disciple is called to learn from him. For the Jewish people, the law was sometimes referred to as a “yoke” and Jesus’ use of that term certainly won a hearing with the disciples.

In the eighth chapter of Romans, Paul is reflecting on the difference between a person guided by the Spirit and one who is “in the flesh”. If a person does not have the Spirit of Christ, he or she is living in the flesh and will not participate in the divine life given in baptism. If the person is living in the Spirit, sin and death is conquered and the person will have (eternal) life in communion with God.

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved


Homily :: July 2, 2017

07/02/17: Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      07/02/17: Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(6:07, 5.60 MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      07/02/17: Thirteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(7:33, 6.92MB)

Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Matthew 10:37-42
The reality of early Christian discipleship always had the potential of being harsh. Hard choices had to be made and these choices could effect one’s relationship with one’s family. Keep in mind that family membership, identity, support, and care were held in highest honor by the culture of Jesus. Family was everything. The teaching of Jesus does not say that one should value and love family less, but it does say that one must value and love Jesus more (Mt 10:37). If ever one had to choose between family or Jesus the choice always had to be Jesus. This is a true test of discipleship and some would find it impossible.

Disciples must know that the way of discipleship is not a way of glory, power, and wealth. It is, at its core, the way of the cross (Mt 10:38). Without the cross there is no resurrection. Without death there is no new life. For a disciple what really constitutes life will appear like death to others, and what others see as death will be life for a disciple (Mt 10:39). Discipleship is fundamentally a counter-cultural way to live. The disciple represents Jesus on earth. Therefore whoever receives a disciple in effect actually receives Jesus. In turn, whoever receives Jesus will actually be receiving God (Mt 10:40). Often this all takes place anonymously.

Christian prophets who were often itinerant missionaries deserve to be received as those who speak in the name of God (Mt 10:41). This was not always easy to determine and was sometimes a judgment of faith. Still whoever is willing to risk and to reach out to meet even the most basic needs of a disciple will receive a just reward (Mt 10:42).

By Fr. Eugene Hensell, OSB © 2005, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: June 25, 2017

06/25/17: Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      06/25/17: Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Dave Reeson

(5.21, 4.91MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      06/25/17: Twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time - Fr Pat Nields

(7:05, 6.48MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The first reading from the prophet Jeremiah contains a lament and a declaration of confidence in God who is the source of his strength. As a prophet, Jeremiah experienced pain and suffering for the message that he was charged to deliver to Israel. The first part of today’s reading tells of the struggles he experienced. The last part of the reading expresses his confidant assurance that God “who has rescued the life of the poor from the power of the wicked” is his strength.

The Gospel reading from Matthew follows on this theme of enduring suffering for the sake of the message. It is part of Jesus instruction to the twelve regarding their mission. “Fear no one!” “Do not be afraid!” “Even all the hairs of your head are counted.” These admonitions are to shore up the apostles who in the era when Matthew’s Gospel was written toward the end of the first century were no doubt experiencing opposition and persecution for their persistence in proclaiming the message of Jesus. Those who “acknowledge him” will be acknowledged by God in heaven. This is the promise to the apostles and the promised to us.

The Romans reading immediately follows the selection we heard last week. Paul is reflecting on depth of sin that pervades all humanity, Jew and Gentile alike due to the sin of Adam. Jesus is seen as the new Adam, unstained by sin and giving salvation to all, whether followers of the Law (Jews), or those subject to natural law (Gentiles—everybody else).

By Dale J. Sieverding © 2008, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: June 18, 2017

06/18/17: The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christi)


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      06/18/17: The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christ) - Fr Dave Reeson

(5:52, 5:37 MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      06/18/17: The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ (Corpus Christ) - Fr Pat Nields

(6:34, 6.02 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The Lectionary today includes a non-scriptural passage, the sequence, which comes from the pen of the great theologian Saint Thomas Aquinas. The readings of the celebration deal with bread and wine (and fish in the Gospel) as signs of God’s covenant and of priesthood and remembrance. The sequence comes as a meditation on these same aspects and more as found in the Eucharist: sacrifice, memorial, Communion, salvation, all in Christ. Especially in year C, when the readings are shorter, it is a good idea to sing and preach on the longer version of the Sequence.

The first reading presents the mysterious character of Melchizedek, the king priest of Salem – what we know as Jerusalem. The Gospel reading concerning the loaves and the fishes only heightens this link, from Abraham and Jerusalem to the Covenant of Christ recounted in the first letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians. The love of God fills all of these moments, and continues to be known by us through Communion and through the liturgy. How can we respond to this love, this covenant, this unbreakable friendship, which is life for us?

By Glenn CJ Byer, MA SLD © 2004, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: June 11, 2017

06/11/17: The Most Holy Trinity – Solemnity


Dcn Brian Thomas
Dcn Brian Thomas
      06/11/17: The Most Holy Trinity - Solemnity - Dcn Brian Thomas

(7:38, 6.99 MB)


Deacon David Krueger
Deacon David Krueger
      06/11/17: The Most Holy Trinity - Solemnity - Dcn David Krueger

(6:04, 5.56 MB)


Dcn Bill Hill
Dcn Bill Hill
      06/11/17: The Most Holy Trinity - Solemnity - Dcn Bill Hill

(5:46, 5.28 MB)


Dcn Dave Graef
Dcn Dave Graef
      06/11/17: The Most Holy Trinity - Solemnity - Dcn Dave Graef

(7:15, 6.63 MB)



Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

The Feast of the Most Holy Trinity flows naturally from Pentecost. The Father, having sent the Son, the Father and the Son having sent the Holy Spirit are now celebrated as a unity, as one God. The Gospel makes explicit reference to the events that will happen at Pentecost.

From the second reading today we can begin to see how the Church came to understand the Trinitarian nature of God as such a basic reality of the faith that it is used as a way to end letters. There is no need to explain the nature of the relationship; it lives in the holy greeting that Christians give one another, then as now.

This understanding was not part of the revelation found in the Old Testament, and so we are not surprised that the Old Testament readings focus on the eternity of God and the name of God, rather than on an explicit Trinitarian theme.

By Glenn CJ Byer, MA SLD © 2005, OCP. All rights reserved.


Homily :: June 4, 2017

06/04/17: Pentecost: Day – Solemnity


Fr. Dave Reeson
Fr. Dave Reeson

      06/04/17: Pentecost: Day - Solemnity - Fr Dave Reeson

(4:18, 3.94MB)


Fr Pat Nields
Fr Pat Nields

      06/04/17: Pentecost: Day - Solemnity - Fr Pat Nields

(7:58, 7.58MB)


Fr Dennis Hannamen
Fr Dennis Hannamen

      06/04/17: Pentecost: Day - Solemnity - Fr Dennis Hanneman

(9:21, 8.57 MB)


Fr Tony Ike
Fr Tony Ike

      06/04/17: Pentecost: Day - Solemnity - Fr Tony Ike

(11:25, 10.4 MB)


Daily Readings

Today’s Reading

Like the feast of the Ascension of the Lord, the Lectionary gives some options for this day in the various years of the three-year cycle of readings.

In all years we hear the wonderful reading from the Acts of the Apostles, which describes how people from all over the known world, from Parthia, Media and Elam (current Iran and parts of places as far away as Azerbaijan, Afghanistan and Pakistan), Mesopotamia (Iraq), Judea (with Galilee made up Israel) Cappadocia, Pontus, Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia (Asia minor) Egypt, Libya (North Africa), Rome.

The Greeks get added to the procession of nations in the first option in all years for the second reading, where we are all called to be baptized and so share in the one Holy Spirit.

Pentecost is one of the few days left in the liturgical calendar that calls for the use of the Sequence. The Sequence is a poetic text, designed to be sung, which prepares us to better hear the message that we know is coming, the message of the Gospel.

The Gospel for Pentecost is taken from the Gospel of John. It is the scene from Easter evening, when Jesus bestows the Holy Spirit.

By Glenn CJ Byer, MA SLD © 2005, OCP. All rights reserved.


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